Incense Cones

Incense Cones are another alternative to incense sticks. Here are the sweet incense cone-shapes (eg by pressing in a die), they do not need a supportive wooden stick. The origin of Incense is in Japan, and since compared to incense sticks, these are a less fragile form of incense and was more suitable for export. The same ingredients are used in the production (essential oils, resins, roots, flowers, leaves, seeds, fruits) are used  for the incense.

How to use incense cones

 
  • The incense cones are lit at the top.
  • The flame is blown out after a few seconds and then the taper glows by itself.
  • The Incense glows to its base so they must be burned up on a non-combustible base or a fitting incense holder.
tibetan_incense_cones japanese_incense_cones indian_incense_cones
     
Incense Cones are another alternative to incense sticks. Here are the sweet incense cone-shapes (eg by pressing in a die), they do not need a supportive wooden stick. The origin of Incense is in... read more »
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Incense Cones

Incense Cones are another alternative to incense sticks. Here are the sweet incense cone-shapes (eg by pressing in a die), they do not need a supportive wooden stick. The origin of Incense is in Japan, and since compared to incense sticks, these are a less fragile form of incense and was more suitable for export. The same ingredients are used in the production (essential oils, resins, roots, flowers, leaves, seeds, fruits) are used  for the incense.

How to use incense cones

 
  • The incense cones are lit at the top.
  • The flame is blown out after a few seconds and then the taper glows by itself.
  • The Incense glows to its base so they must be burned up on a non-combustible base or a fitting incense holder.
tibetan_incense_cones japanese_incense_cones indian_incense_cones